Teen dating violence power and control wheel

Posted by / 08-Mar-2020 04:10

Teen dating violence power and control wheel

It shows a victim that they are not alone in what they are experiencing, and that these tactics of maintaining power and control are common to abusers.

We also use the wheel to help other callers like friends, family members or even someone who may identify as abusive to better understand the complicated components of abuse and the many forms it can take.

Things to do when ending an abusive relationship Keep a dated record of the abuse.

Do not meet your partner alone, or let them into your house or car while you are along.

While the inside of the wheel is comprised of subtle, continual behaviors, the outer ring represents physical, visible violence.

These are the abusive acts that are more overt and forceful, and often the intense acts that reinforce the regular use of other subtler methods of abuse. Our advocates use the wheel to help teach callers about the dynamics of an abusive relationship.

Have you been held down, shoved, pushed, hit, kicked, or had things thrown at you by your partner?

About one in ten teen couples is affected by dating violence.

Questions to ask in identifying abusive behavior: Are you unable to disagree with him/her?

The Power and Control wheel gives examples of the types of abuse listed above.

The abuse is based on one partners need for having power and control over the other.

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Avoid being alone at school, at work, and on your way to and from places.

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